Oct 15, 2020

TCS is helping customers prepare for business 4.0

William Girling
3 min
Vinay Singhvi, Business Unit Head of BFSI for the UK and Ireland, describes TCS’ commitment to helping clients navigate digital transformation
Vinay Singhvi, Business Unit Head of BFSI for the UK and Ireland, describes TCS’ commitment to helping clients navigate digital transformation...

Vinay Singhvi, Business Unit Head of BFSI for the UK and Ireland, describes TCS’ commitment to helping clients navigate digital transformation.

Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) is a company that almost requires no introduction: one of the largest and most innovative companies in India with a global reach and almost 450,000 employees, it is a true leader in IT and consulting services. “TCS is one of the world's largest and most recognised brands in its field. Our focus has always been to help customers drive their growth and transformation journeys,” states Vinay Singhvi, Business Unit Head of BFSI (banking, financial services and insurance) for the UK and Ireland. A part of the company for over 20 years, he started as a Systems Analyst in 1999 and gradually ascended to Global Client Director in 2013, before finally securing his current position in 2018.

When asked to consider how TCS has managed to attain such high stature in the UK business community, Singhvi highlights its corporate ethos as essential. “The way we work is primarily about keeping customers at the centre and planning everything around them to ensure we are aligned to both their strategy and their business goals,” he explains. Fundamentally, TCS champions an approach that is cutting-edge without sacrificing the human touch, something that Singhvi considers will only become more important as technology keeps evolving. “It’s not about machines replacing humans; it’s about the augmentation that needs to happen and how hyperautomation and AI (artificial intelligence) will enrich the entire human experience.”

One partner reaping the benefits of this approach is insurance company Vitality, with which TCS has built a relationship stretching back over 10 years. Recognising early on that Vitality’s incentive-based health and wellness insurance platform held revolutionary potential for the industry, TCS began a partnership with the brand, which now, according to Singhvi, “has got one of the best brand recalls within the UK market.” Furthermore, their close integration goes beyond a simple supplier-client relationship, as Singhvi describes, “We do not see ourselves as separate from Vitality. It’s about us working together to understand and implement their strategy and help them in achieving their purpose. Our teams that work as part of Vitality see themselves as more Vitality than TCS, that's how deeply integrated they are.”

A strong believer in preparing for the next generation of digitally-inflected business (Business 4.0), TCS is prioritising a three pillar framework for its customers to help them lead in the new normal based on ‘purpose-centricity’, ‘building resilience’ and ‘being adaptable.’” This approach will be invaluable in its continuing relationship with Vitality: “The insurance industry is run by the underlying data and what the data tells you,” Singhvi states. There’s also a crucial security aspect: cybersecurity and the networks and systems that need to be combined.” Although the future is daunting, TCS has the industry-proven reputation needed to guide its clients through the digital revolution. In a final display of its forward-thinking, Singhvi also details the company’s ‘25 by 25’ vision. “25 by 25 illustrates that, in our view, by the year 2025, all our systems and ways of working will be aligned, so that only 25% of TCS workforce will work out of TCS facilities at any time. In this regard, we are very excited that TCS is taking a leadership position on new ways of working, not just in the UK but globally.”

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Jun 16, 2021

SAS: Improving the British Army’s decision making with data

SAS
British Army
3 min
Roderick Crawford, VP and Country GM, explains the important role that SAS is playing in the British Army’s digital transformation

SAS’ long-standing relationship with the British Army is built on mutual respect and grounded by a reciprocal understanding of each others’ capabilities, strengths, and weaknesses. Roderick Crawford, VP and Country GM for SAS UKI, states that the company’s thorough grasp of the defence sector makes it an ideal partner for the Army as it undergoes its own digital transformation. 

“Major General Jon Cole told us that he wanted to enable better, faster decision-making in order to improve operational efficiency,” he explains. Therefore, SAS’ task was to help the British Army realise the “significant potential” of data through the use of artificial intelligence (AI) to automate tasks and conduct complex analysis.

In 2020, the Army invested in the SAS ‘Viya platform’ as an overture to embarking on its new digital roadmap. The goal was to deliver a new way of working that enabled agility, flexibility, faster deployment, and reduced risk and cost: “SAS put a commercial framework in place to free the Army of limits in terms of their access to our tech capabilities.”

Doing so was important not just in terms of facilitating faster innovation but also, in Crawford’s words, to “connect the unconnected.” This means structuring data in a simultaneously secure and accessible manner for all skill levels, from analysts to data engineers and military commanders. The result is that analytics and decision-making that drives innovation and increases collaboration.

Crawford also highlights the importance of the SAS platform’s open nature, “General Cole was very clear that the Army wanted a way to work with other data and analytics tools such as Python. We allow them to do that, but with improved governance and faster delivery capabilities.”

SAS realises that collaboration is at the heart of a strong partnership and has been closely developing a long-term roadmap with the Army. “Although we're separate organisations, we come together to work effectively as one,” says Crawford. “Companies usually find it very easy to partner with SAS because we're a very open, honest, and people-based business by nature.”

With digital technology itself changing with great regularity, it’s safe to imagine that SAS’ own relationship with the Army will become even closer and more diverse. As SAS assists it in enhancing its operational readiness and providing its commanders with a secure view of key data points, Crawford is certain that the company will have a continually valuable role to play.

“As warfare moves into what we might call ‘the grey-zone’, the need to understand, decide, and act on complex information streams and diverse sources has never been more important. AI, computer vision and natural language processing are technologies that we hope to exploit over the next three to five years in conjunction with the Army.”

Fundamentally, data analytics is a tool for gaining valuable insights and expediting the delivery of outcomes. The goal of the two parties’ partnership, concludes Crawford, will be to reach the point where both access to data and decision-making can be performed qualitatively and in real-time.

“SAS is absolutely delighted to have this relationship with the British Army, and across the MOD. It’s a great privilege to be part of the armed forces covenant.”

 

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