May 19, 2020

Business Continuity During a Global Crisis

Leadership
SocialChorus
covid-19
Nicole Alvino, Co-founder and ...
4 min
Business Continuity During a Global Crisis

Nicole Alvino, Co-founder and Chief Strategy Officer, SocialChorus, outlines the key challenges CIOs face in communicating to their workforce during this crisis and how they can overcome them.

We’re living through an unprecedented time, globally and for how long, none of us are that sure. While the new coronavirus may seem like a singular threat, dealing with crises is a fact of doing business—one companies can expect to encounter with increasing frequency. According to PWC, 69% of businesses had experienced a crisis in the last five years even before COVID-19, and the most disruptive causes of crises in the U.S. were natural or environmental. 

Under these conditions, it’s likely that your company already has crisis management and business continuity plans in place. But what should you do to ensure your infrastructure is robust enough and capable of helping you to reach all your workers?

There are five critical challenges that CIOs will face as they try to utilise their stack to reach employees. If you’re a CIO, then you know that you’re the best-equipped person in your executive team to plan for business continuity but to be successful you’re going to need every person, across the entire business to understand your plans. Ultimately, your company is looking for you to:

·  Establish a source of truth for your company and communicate with one voice, so employees can separate rumours from facts and trust what they’re being told.

·  Reach every worker on every digital channel with the targeted, personalised information they need to respond in an emergency.

·  Use intelligent automation to certify message delivery, prompt response, and make sure your crisis communications are not just read but understood.

·  Track the success of crisis initiatives and measure the effectiveness of your communications using in-depth analytics.

·  Be prepared for emergency situations during COVID-19 and beyond – your stack and your workforce need to prepare for every twist and turn during this pandemic.

As you and the senior leadership team implement your crisis communications strategy you (and they) will ask whether you can reach every employee on every digital channel, even those that are remote. And can you reach them with personalised, up-to-the-minute information that they need? You’ll need to ensure that whatever communications technology you use, whether it be SharePoint, Slack, Zoom, Teams, mobile apps or others, that you can consistently reach and broadcast your company’s messages to all.

One thing we’re hearing is that people are overwhelmed with communications. On average a worker receives 120 emails per day, that’s not counting the ones via other channels such as Slack, IM or Teams. Now consider that your people, like you, are also getting bombarded by emails from school, IM from friends and family and messages via Facebook and WhatsApp. There is an information overload going on so whatever you do, you need to make sure your messages reach people urgently and that they can review them promptly. Our latest paper on CIO Crisis Communications takes you through several steps on how to reach all employees, across all channels, consistently.

Consistency from your business will help to establish trust in your message, especially if you’re able to deliver it immediately to all. And that’s of paramount importance. You don’t want workers in the London office getting communications three hours later than those in Paris or Madrid, or the other side of the world for that matter. All employees are equal, and all deserve to be communicated with, no matter where they are. They may consume your communications in different ways so use your different channels to reach all.

You’ll also need to judge how many times you communicate. Don’t hassle people as we’ve said, they’re inundated with messages already. If you need to know that they’ve received a critical message or piece of advice, then track acknowledgements or read receipts. Then you can take further communications actions with those that are unresponsive and not send repeat messages company-wide.

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COVID-19 is changing the way we live and the way we work. In a world where change seems to be the only constant be the consistent voice across your organisation. Your emergency plans may need to be tweaked over the coming weeks, your infrastructure might need to be extended to ensure your reach is truly companywide but remember it is the companies that manage this situation well that will thrive through the chaos.

For more information on business topics in Africa, please take a look at the latest edition of Business Chief Africa.

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Jun 14, 2021

5 minutes with... Janthana Kaenprakhamroy, CEO, Tapoly

Tapoly
Insurance
Leadership
Digital
Kate Birch
3 min
Heading up Europe’s first on-demand insurance platform for the gig economy, Janthana Kaenprakhamroy is winning awards and leading with diversity

Founder and CEO of award-winning insurtech firm Tapoly, Janthana Kaenprakhamroy heads up Europe’s first on-demand insurance platform for the gig economy, winning industry awards, innovating in the digital insurance space, and leading with inclusivity.

Here, Business Chief talks to Janthana about her leadership style and skills. 

What do you do, in a nutshell?

I’m founder and CEO of Tapoly, a digital MGA providing a full stack of commercial lines insurance specifically for SMEs and freelancers, as well as a SaaS solution to connect insurers with their distribution partners. We build bespoke, end-to-end platforms encompassing the whole customer journey, but can also integrate our APIs within existing systems. We were proud to win Insurance Provider of the Year at the British Small Business Awards 2018 and receive silver in the Insurtech category at the Efma & Accenture Innovation in Insurance Awards 2019.

How would you describe your leadership style?

I try to be as inclusive a leader as possible. I’m committed to creating space for everyone to shine. Many of the roles at Tapoly are performed by women and I speak at industry events to encourage more people to get involved in insurance/insurtech. Similarly, I always try to maintain a growth mindset. I think it’s important to retain values to support learning and development, like reliability, working hard and punctuality.

What’s the best leadership advice you’ve received?

Build your network and seek advice. As a leader, you need smart people around you to help you grow your business. It’s not about personally being the best, but being able to find resources and get help where needed.

How do you see leadership changing in a COVID world?

I think the pandemic has proven the importance of inclusive leadership so that everyone feels supported and valued. It’s also shown the importance of being flexible as a leader. We’ve had to remain adaptable to continue delivering high levels of customer service. This flexibility has also been important when supporting employees as everyone has had individual pressures to deal with during this time. Leaders should continue to embed this flexibility within their organisations moving forward.

They say ‘from every crisis comes opportunity’, what opportunities do you see?

The past year has been challenging, but it has also proven the importance of digital transformation in insurance. When working from home was required, it was much harder for insurers to adjust who had not embedded technology within their operating processes because they did not have data stored in the cloud and it caused communication delays with concerned customers at a time when this communication should have been a priority, which ultimately impacts the level of customer satisfaction. This demonstrates the importance of what we are trying to achieve at Tapoly in driving digitalisation in insurance and making communication between insurers and distribution partners seamless. 

What advice would you give to your younger self just starting out in the industry?

Start sooner, don’t be afraid to take (calculated) risks and make sure you raise enough money to get you through the initial seed stage.

 

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