May 19, 2020

Digital skills South African graduates will need in 2020

Technology
Digital
Digital Transformation
Tanja Lategan
5 min
Digital skills South African graduates will need in 2020

Tanja Lategan, CEO, Enlight Strategic, discusses the digital skills that school leavers and graduates will need in 2020.

Over the next few months, South African matrics and university graduates will have one eye firmly on the future as they try to identify which path will give them the best chance of career success. And with youth unemployment at nearly 60%, it’s hard to understate the importance of those choices. 

Ironically, far too few young people are making the choice to go into the digital and technology spaces, where South Africa is experiencing a major skills shortage. So bad is the skills shortage that research from the Institute of Information Technology Professionals South Africa (IITPSA) shows that 37% of employers are recruiting from outside South Africa’s borders to fulfil their technology needs.

It’s also important to remember that, today, digital skills are needed in every industry. A PWC study, for instance, found that some 80% of business leaders in the financial services space are concerned about skills shortages as an impediment to growth.  

Young people acquiring digital skills isn’t just an important way to reduce unemployment, therefore, but also an important step in growing the economy. But technology and digital are broad fields, encompassing a wide variety of skills. So, where does one start? 

The following new areas are rapidly developing and in need of skilled professionals:

Artificial intelligence 

A lot of people are fearful of the impact that artificial intelligence (AI) will have on human workers, believing that it will see them replaced entirely. 

In the future, however, we are more likely to see something called “augmented humanity” where the majority of workers are being assisted by AI rather than replaced. 

It is predicted that by 2020, AI will be a positive net job motivator, creating 2.3 million jobs while only eliminating 1.8 million jobs. Young people are in a great position to take advantage and should look to develop the specific skills required for the jobs of the future. 

As much as businesses will need people who can build AI-enabled solutions, they’ll also need employees who can understand where AI will and won’t benefit the business. While the former requires dedicated study, some basic short courses on AI will go a long way to helping with the latter. 

Internet of Things 

Broadly speaking, the Internet of Things (IoT) refers to the growing system of interrelated computing devices, mechanical and digital machines, objects, animals or people. This interconnectedness is changing the way we run cities, transport networks, factories, and even offices. 

People who can build and service IoT devices, as well as those who program the software they run on will be in high demand.  

Also highly valued, however, will be the people who can understand and analyse the high volumes of data that come from IoT systems and extrapolate what they mean for the businesses concerned. 

Analytics

But IoT devices aren’t the only things producing data. We live in an age of massive data, producing around 2.5 quintillion bytes of data each day. And by 2020, there will be around 40 trillion gigabytes of data (40 zettabytes). Anyone capable of processing and analysing that data is, and will continue to be, in high demand. 

The shortage is so acute that one South African institution providing courses in data science offers graduates their course fees back if they don’t find a job with an annual starting salary of R240 000 or higher.  

Here again, being able to use the available tools such as Oribi and Decibel are incredibly sought-after skills and don’t require any programming ability.

SEE ALSO:

Automation 

Automation is another trend which fearmongers believe will result in mass job losses. But implemented properly, it can actually help workers be more productive and add value. 

In the digital marketing space, for instance, automation software takes care of repetitive tasks, reduces human error, helps workers manage complexity, and allows them to measure and optimise their efforts.

As technology starts managing more mundane tasks, specific human qualities such as creativity and cognitive flexibility will become more important. Jobs that will remain in high demand include sales executives, customer service and experience agents, people co-ordination and people management roles, creative directors and technologists, software developers, computer programmers, and of course data scientists to name but a few.

It should hardly be surprising then that the World Economic Forum’s top 10 skills for 2020 include:

  1. Complex problem solving

  2. Critical thinking

  3. Creativity

  4. People management

  5. Coordinating with others

  6. Emotional Intelligence

  7. Judgment and Decision making

  8. Service Orientation

  9. Negotiation

  10. Cognitive flexibility

Exposure and opportunity  

Of course, the nature of South Africa’s unequal society and the attendant education issues mean that many young people simply aren’t exposed to these skills and the opportunities they present.

While several organisations, including codeX, WeThinkCode, and Google Digital Skills for Africa, are looking to change that, they can only do so much. 

If we’re to make a real dent in youth unemployment, the education system needs to be overhauled to ensure that digital skills are baked into the entire curriculum. If not, then even the young people who are aware of the opportunities it presents will always be playing catch up.  

Young people need to know that these skills are in high demand and direct their efforts at acquiring them. It is ironic that in a country with an unemployment rate as high as South Africa’s there are industries desperate to employ people. By bridging the gap between business and youth, we can close the skills gap and tackle youth unemployment at the same time. It may be a challenge, but it’s far from insurmountable. 

For more information on business topics in the Middle East and Africa, please take a look at the latest edition of Business Chief MEA.

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Jun 11, 2021

G7 Summit guide: What it is and what leaders hope to achieve

G7
Sustainability
G7Summit
EU
3 min
Business Chief delves into what the G7 is and represents and what its 2021 summit hopes to achieve, in terms of sustainability and global trade

Unless you’ve had your head buried in the sand, you’ll have seen the term ‘G7’ plastered all over the Internet this week. We’re going to give you the skinny on exactly what the G7 is and what its purpose on this planet is ─ and whether it’s a good or a bad collaboration. 

 

Who are the G7?

The Group of Seven, or ‘G7’, may sound like a collective of pirate lords from a certain Disney smash-hit, but in reality, it’s a group of the world’s seven largest “advanced” economies ─ the powerhouses of the world, if you like. 

The merry band comprises:

  • Canada
  • France
  • Germany
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • The United Kingdom
  • The United States

Historically, Russia was a member of the then-called ‘G8’ but found itself excluded after their ever-so-slightly illegal takeover of Crimea back in 2014.

 

Since 1977, the European Union has also been involved in some capacity with the G7 Summit. The Union is not recognised as an official member, but gradually, as with all Europe-linked affairs, the Union has integrated itself into the conversation and is now included in all political discussions on the annual summit agenda. 

 

When was the ‘G’ formed?

Back in 1975, when the world was reeling from its very first oil shock and the subsequent financial fallout that came with it, the heads of state and government from six of the leading industrial countries had a face-to-face meeting at the Chateau de Rambouillet to discuss the global economy, its trajectory, and what they could do to address the economic turmoil that reared its ugly head throughout the 70s. 

 

Why does the G7 exist?

At this very first summit ─ the ‘G6’ summit ─, the leaders adopted a 15-point communiqué, the Declaration of Rambouillet, and agreed to continuously meet once a year moving forward to address the problems of the day, with a rotating Presidency. One year later, Canada was welcomed into the fold, and the ‘G6’ became seven and has remained so ever since ─ Russia’s inclusion and exclusion not counted. 

 

The group, as previously mentioned, was born in the looming shadow of a financial crisis, but its purpose is more significant than just economics. When leaders from the group meet, they discuss and exchange ideas on a broad range of issues, including injustice around the world, geopolitical matters, security, and sustainability. 

 

It’s worth noting that, while the G7 may be made up of mighty nations, the bloc is an informal one. So, although it is considered an important annual event, declarations made during the summit are not legally binding. That said, they are still very influential and worth taking note of because it indicates the ambitions and outlines the initiatives of these particularly prominent leading nations. 

 

Where is the 2021 G7 summit?

This year, the summit will be held in the United Kingdom deep in the southwest of England, with Prime Minister Boris Johnson hosting his contemporaries in the quaint Cornish resort of Carbis Bay near St Ives in Cornwall. 
 

What will be discussed this year? 

After almost two years of remote communication, this will be the first in-person G7 summit since the novel Coronavirus first took hold of the globe, and Britain wants “leaders to seize the opportunity to build back better from coronavirus, uniting to make the future fairer, greener, and more prosperous.”

 

The three-day summit, running from Friday to Sunday, will see the seven leaders discussing a whole host of shared challenges, ranging from the pandemic and vaccine development and distribution to the ongoing global fight against climate change through the implementation of sustainable norms and values. 

 

According to the UK government, the attendees will also be taking a look at “ensuring that people everywhere can benefit from open trade, technological change, and scientific discovery.” 

 

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