Merck one step ahead in combating diabetes in Africa

By mahlokoane percy ngwato

Follow @AfricaBizReview on Twitter and @HealthCareGlbl

Merck, a leading healthcare product developer, is collaborating with Universities in Africa and Asia to introduce European Accredited diabetes management qualifications.

Our sister publication Healthcare Global also reported on Merck's education initiatives in both Africa and Asia

The 5-year program has been successfully implemented across Kenya, Uganda, Namibia, Angola, Ghana, Tanzania, and Mozambique; it will expand into further sub-Saharan countries in coming years.

Rasha Kelej, Vice President of Merck Serono said: “The socio-economic burden of the disease can be reduced by timely interventions from trained healthcare professionals, so as many patients can be prevented from becoming diabetics at early stages.”

The Merck Capacity Advancement Program aims to expanding professional capacity in R&D, clinical research, supply chain integrity and efficiency, and pharmacovigilance. Due attention is given to providing adequate education to medical and pharmacy undergraduates, in addition to physicians and pharmacists in difficult to reach areas.

Merck has been managing diabetes cases since the late 1950s when it developed metformin; it is now seeking to raise awareness of the condition in less developed countries through public education and supporting local health care systems to help prevent, diagnose and manage the disease.

As part of its Capacity Advancement Program (CAP) over 5,000 African medical students in partnership with universities including Nairobi, Makerere, Namibia and Ghana, will benefit from the management training.

Merck is planning to target more than 15,000 students by the end of 2018, expanding to more African, Asian, Latin American and Middle Eastern countries with particular focus on non-communicable diseases such as diabetes, cancer, thyroid dysfunction and fertility management.

As Africa’s middle class grows in line with economic sophistication and growth, there will be an inevitable increase in the incidence in diseases of affluence; having education and training in place will doubtless save many lives. 

Share

Featured Articles

Musk’s multibillion hostile Twitter takeover – the timeline

As billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk buys Twitter for US$44bn, we draw up a timeline, from the buying of shares to the critical tweets and unsolicited bid

Sustainable moves businesses can make to win customers, IBM

With half of consumers saying environmental sustainability is more important today than a year ago, businesses should up their eco action, says IBM report

Banks and consultancies top workplaces to grow career in UK

Financial and professional services firms rank highest in LinkedIn Top 25 best workplaces list – from Barclays, Lloyds and HSBC, to PwC, Deloitte and EY

Top 10 women in technology in Europe

Leadership & Strategy

The value of ESG links sustainability to business returns

Sustainability

Top 10 European football clubs by revenue 2022 – Deloitte

Corporate Finance