May 19, 2020

How much is your Business Wasting on Wifi in Hotels, Airports and on Trains?

Technology
Hospitality Industry
Annifer Jackson
2 min
 How much is your Business Wasting on Wifi in Hotels, Airports and on Trains?

Business travellers paying to stay connected whilst they travel are costing British companies more than £370 million each year, according to new global research from Amba Hotels.

The average UK business traveller spends £16.30 on Wi-Fi and roaming charges on each trip – a third more than the average spend in the US where free Wi-Fi is more widely available.

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It appears that hotels and airports are the worst offenders, with some charging up to £17 for 24 hours. Having to pay for Wi-Fi services also impacts the efficiency of the working day with up to 70 percent of business travellers regularly unable to work efficiently due to slow or unreliable Wi-Fi connections.

For example twenty percent have been unable to join a work call or videoconferencing meeting, almost a fifth have been late for an important conference or video call, and one in 10 have felt the impact on their personal lives after being unable to contact friends and family.

Financial commentator and founder of letssavemoney.com Sarah Willingham said: “Fast, free, reliable Wi-Fi is non-negotiable for modern business travellers. With airlines and rail companies investing in Wi-Fi on board and international roaming charges falling dramatically, it’s inexcusable to keep charging extortionate rates for patchy Wi-Fi connections.”

The research highlights the overall cost of Wi-Fi to businesses globally and in key business travel markets:

  • France – €232 million annually (average spend €22.10 per trip)
  • UK – £371 million annually (average spend £16.30 per trip)
  • Germany – €3.6 billion annually (average spend €21.10 per trip)
  • US – $7.3 billion annually (average spend $15.10 per trip)

 

To help businesses and consumers avoid expensive Wi-Fi charges, Amba Hotels has teamed up with RottenWiFi.com to track the best and worst Wi-Fi hotspots.

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May 11, 2021

Mambu and the UAE’s digital banking journey

Banque Saudi Fransi
Mambu
Joanna England
3 min
Mambu and the UAE’s digital banking journey
Miljan Stamenkovic, Mambu’s General Manager for MENA, talks technology and digital transformation...

Miljan Stamenkovic enjoys the dynamic and constantly evolving world of fintech banking. In his current role as General Manager for MENA for Mambu, Stamenkovic sees opportunity in abundance. 

“When I joined Mambu with my team in 2019, we came with the fintech, entrepreneurial mindset and DNA to build and grow Mambu’s business in the MENA (Middle East and North Africa) region. Before 2019, the region used to remind me of a desert, at least in terms of cloud service providers and cloud adoption. But this past year has been a wave of progress.” In November 2020, Mambu opened a new office in Abu Dhabi Global Market, as the region has quickly become a key market for Mambu.

He explains, “There are data protection laws. There are cybersecurity regulations and most importantly, a variety of major tier one cloud service providers that are available. But what particularly excites me here at Mambu is the opportunity to rethink business models together with our clients and really bring them to life. This is where I saw a great fit with Mambu and its composable philosophy.”

Creating a neobank and challenger bank ecosystem has been his ultimate goal. “In my opinion, this actually creates a unique opportunity to partner with some of the best fintechs in the region and build the region’s first and true challenger and neobanks.”

Stamenkovic credits Mambu’s partnership with Banque Saudi Fransi (BSF) for the success that has driven the bank forward in the region. “When I think about all the challenger and neobanks that have grown massively over the past decade,there is one common denominator for all these new initiatives. I would say they really operate like a tech company rather than a bank. - BSF is leading this approach in Saudi Arabia.”

He continues, “This brings a competitive advantage for tech companies. These platforms are each managed individually but can be swapped in and out. And when put together, they actually form the backbone of a company's technology capability. This is why tech companies and banks like BSF actually can get products to the market a hundred times faster than their more incumbent peers.”

The implementation, he stresses, is an evolving process, where each component is trialled and checked and swapped in and out according to its effectiveness. But it’s down to the dynamism of the team on the project to initiate these changes. “As critical as technology is to digital transformation, the DNA of people working on these initiatives is the key to success. At BSF they have a true startup and entrepreneurial mentality.”

He explains that Mambu is helping BSF deliver an entire new banking experience while providing soft core banking services hosted, in this case in Saudi Arabia. “Mambu sits at the heart of BSF's new challenger bank and its technology stack. So, this actually enables BSF to take an entirely cloud native approach, having Mambu at the centre of its ‘Digital Engine’.”

Stamenkovic points out, “Mambu enables banking like a modern tech company. Banks used to be built to last, but today they need to be built to change. And that's what we're enabling here.” 

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