May 19, 2020

Africa: The $2.7 Trillion Continent is securing growth transformation

Johannesburg
Africa
Association of Chartered Certified Accountants
Chief Experience Officer African Convention
Bizclik Editor
3 min
Africa: The $2.7 Trillion Continent is securing growth transformation

The challenges and opportunities facing Africa in the digital age have been tackled by experts at the first Chief Experience Officer (CXO) African Convention, organised by ACCA (the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants) in Johannesburg, South Africa.

 The conference boasted representatives from seven of the top ten African economies, bringing together outstanding leaders from across the continent to debate opportunities, challenges and pivotal issues that matter for Africa’s future.

The convention provided experts with a platform to deliberate on a range of themes from opportunities of Africa as the emerging digital continent, to the possibilities presented from access to the world’s youngest talent pool.

 Keynote speaker Professor Oliver Saasa, Managing Consultant and Chief Executive Officer of Premier Consult Ltd, said: “There’s a new wave of optimism sweeping the continent.

“Africa’s overall Gross Domestic Product has indicated a steadily increase from 5.5 percent between 2005 and 2008. In 2009, the GDP increased by an additional 2.4percent, continuing to a 4.7 percent upturn in 2010 and reaching 5.2 percent in 2014.

 “If you look deep into the African continent you will note that this performance is boosted and sustained by rising investment in infrastructure and natural resources, and solid household spending.

“Non-resource-rich countries, particularly Ethiopia, also experienced steady growth in 2013. Nigeria is expected to continue growing by between 6.7 percent and 7.3 percent in 2013 and 2014 respectively whilst Ghana’s average growth in 2013/14 is likely to exceed eight percent. Evidently, Africa is indeed blossoming.”

 “2013 noted a continued rise of capital flows to numerous southern African countries, reaching an approximated 5.3 prcent of regional GDP, soundly above the developing-country average of 3.9 percent.

“Lower global food prices, prudent monetary policies and reduced inflation in certain African regions, growing 6.3 percent annual rate in 2013, compared with 10.7 percent a year ago.

“Countries such as Ghana and Malawi have noted raised inflation due to depreciating currencies.

“Remittances grew 6.2 percent to an estimated $32 billion in 2013, greater than the $30 billion mark reached in 2011. The inflows, combined with lower food prices, increased household real income and spending,” said Prof Saasa.

While Africa’s overall GDP growth rate is expected to remain stronger, a number of important risks remain.

 Risks such as political uncertainty, locally volatile food prices and commodity services still negatively affect the continent.

Nenad Pacek, President of Global Success Advisors, said: “There is a great absence of procedures and parameters in African markets.

 “African countries need to change their policies in order to allow foreign investors to feel at home in Africa.

 Jamil Ampomah, ACCA Director Sub-Saharan Africa said: “The accountancy profession has a critical role to play in ensuring that the emerging opportunities are well managed for the sustainable development of the region.”

 Africa maturing is the standpoint; collectiveness and collaboration will surely see Africa through exponential growth.

Moreover, digitalisation will expose businesses to new profitable markets with less expenditure and more out-reach. 

African countries have a real opportunity to capitalise on their resource endowments and high international commodity prices, as well as on opportunities from changes in the global economy to promote economic transformation through commodity-based industrialisation and to address poverty, inequality and unemployment, the convention heard.

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Jun 14, 2021

5 minutes with... Janthana Kaenprakhamroy, CEO, Tapoly

Tapoly
Insurance
Leadership
Digital
Kate Birch
3 min
Heading up Europe’s first on-demand insurance platform for the gig economy, Janthana Kaenprakhamroy is winning awards and leading with diversity

Founder and CEO of award-winning insurtech firm Tapoly, Janthana Kaenprakhamroy heads up Europe’s first on-demand insurance platform for the gig economy, winning industry awards, innovating in the digital insurance space, and leading with inclusivity.

Here, Business Chief talks to Janthana about her leadership style and skills. 

What do you do, in a nutshell?

I’m founder and CEO of Tapoly, a digital MGA providing a full stack of commercial lines insurance specifically for SMEs and freelancers, as well as a SaaS solution to connect insurers with their distribution partners. We build bespoke, end-to-end platforms encompassing the whole customer journey, but can also integrate our APIs within existing systems. We were proud to win Insurance Provider of the Year at the British Small Business Awards 2018 and receive silver in the Insurtech category at the Efma & Accenture Innovation in Insurance Awards 2019.

How would you describe your leadership style?

I try to be as inclusive a leader as possible. I’m committed to creating space for everyone to shine. Many of the roles at Tapoly are performed by women and I speak at industry events to encourage more people to get involved in insurance/insurtech. Similarly, I always try to maintain a growth mindset. I think it’s important to retain values to support learning and development, like reliability, working hard and punctuality.

What’s the best leadership advice you’ve received?

Build your network and seek advice. As a leader, you need smart people around you to help you grow your business. It’s not about personally being the best, but being able to find resources and get help where needed.

How do you see leadership changing in a COVID world?

I think the pandemic has proven the importance of inclusive leadership so that everyone feels supported and valued. It’s also shown the importance of being flexible as a leader. We’ve had to remain adaptable to continue delivering high levels of customer service. This flexibility has also been important when supporting employees as everyone has had individual pressures to deal with during this time. Leaders should continue to embed this flexibility within their organisations moving forward.

They say ‘from every crisis comes opportunity’, what opportunities do you see?

The past year has been challenging, but it has also proven the importance of digital transformation in insurance. When working from home was required, it was much harder for insurers to adjust who had not embedded technology within their operating processes because they did not have data stored in the cloud and it caused communication delays with concerned customers at a time when this communication should have been a priority, which ultimately impacts the level of customer satisfaction. This demonstrates the importance of what we are trying to achieve at Tapoly in driving digitalisation in insurance and making communication between insurers and distribution partners seamless. 

What advice would you give to your younger self just starting out in the industry?

Start sooner, don’t be afraid to take (calculated) risks and make sure you raise enough money to get you through the initial seed stage.

 

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