May 18, 2020

Kuwait Construction Industry to Hit USD17.5 Billion by end of 2014

Masdar
business review middle east
Perkins + Will
sustainability Middle East
Bizclik Editor
2 min
Kuwait Construction Industry to Hit USD17.5 Billion by end of 2014

Kuwait’s construction industry is set to draw in $17.5 billion-worth of contracts by the end of 2014, nearly doubling the $9.8 billion seen in 2011.

The report conducted by Ventures Middle East puts this rapid growth down to a steady pipeline of major infrastructure projects ongoing and planned for the country, including the Kuwait International Airport (KIA) re-development project, Kuwait Metro project, and the Kuwait National Rail Road System.

Kuwait International Airport

The $698.5 million KIA redevelopment project is one of the key projects in Kuwait, which includes improvement of airport buildings and enhancement of other facilities such as fire stations, rescue centers and service roads.

The planned expansion will increase the airport’s annual capacity to 20 million passengers. Likewise, the construction of the second terminal worth $3.3 billion will be able to handle 13 million passengers annually during the first phases, with plans to increase to 25 million and 50 million during subsequent phases.

Rail infrastructure

The $7 billion Kuwait Metro project is another vital project currently in the stages of design and supervision. Nearly 65 per cent underground, the Metro will cover more than 160 km, comprising 69 stations on its three lines.

The Kuwait National Rail Road System to be built at an investment of $10 billion will be an integrated rail network with a total length of 511 km double track. To be built on a “build, operate and transfer” (BOT) basis, the project is currently in the final process of design with budget and allocation being already made and the tendering process expected to commence soon.   

The Big 5 Kuwait

In line with these industry developments, The Big 5 Kuwait, Kuwait’s largest building and construction exhibition, has announced the launch of its second edition, following a successful debut last year.

To be held from September 22 – 24, 2014 at the Kuwait International Fair, the exhibition will showcase a comprehensive range of innovative products and cutting edge technologies for the construction sector.

Andy White, Group Event Director, The Big 5, said, “The demand for fresh technology and new building material is on a steady rise in Kuwait, driven by a robust performance of the construction and infrastructure sector.

“The total cost of infrastructure and construction projects in 2014 will touch $23.2 billion. All this activity strongly supports the need for The Big 5 Kuwait, which is set to present the latest tools and equipment for the construction sector during its second edition.”

 

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May 11, 2021

5 Minutes With PwC's Amanda Line on Digital Leadership

DigitalLeadrship
Technology
Strategy
Georgia Wilson
4 min
PwC | Digital Leadership | Strategy | Technology
Amanda Line, PwC Partner and PwC’s Academy Leader on what it means to be a digital leader...

1. Define digital leadership, and what it means to be a digital leader?

Leadership has always required a specialised set of skills, such as curiosity, empathy, and decisive action. In today’s world, there is an urgent need for a new type of leader – one who has a digital mindset and has the skills to drive transformation. With the ever-expanding spectrum of new technologies, we need a new wave of digital leaders who not only understand the application of intelligent technologies in the workplace, but also know how to enable and empower their teams - and that comes from frequent upskilling. Digital leaders are represented across numerous sectors and industries, with a common goal to drive a culture of innovation and transformation. 

2. What do you believe are the essential traits of a digital leader?

Knowledge of digital and data literacy is a given essential to have a strong command of the future economy. In my opinion, what’s even more important are human-centric skills. It is the soft skills such as communication, resilience, emotional intelligence, and entrepreneurial thinking that are pivotal in this new-age digital world. 

Despite the demand for future skillsets, we’re currently facing the biggest skills shortage of our lifetime. PwC’s Middle East CEO survey highlighted that 80% of CEOs believe that a shortage of skills in the workforce is one of the key threats to their organisation’s growth prospects. 

Part of our drive at PwC’s Academy Middle East in leading the upskilling revolution in the region is to facilitate lasting change. We deliver innovative and practical training, that includes both digital and soft skills components, for individuals and organisations across industries to create a truly future-ready workforce in the Middle East.

3. How have these traits changed since the outbreak of COVID-19, or have they remained the same but their significance has grown?

Prior to the pandemic, the World Economic Forum set an ambitious target to upskill one billion people by 2030. This was initiated to tackle the 75 million jobs expected to be displaced by automation and AI by 2022. Since Covid-19, the window of opportunity to reskill has become shorter in the newly constrained labour market.[1] 

The way we live, work and learn has changed drastically, placing digital technologies at the forefront. The pace of change has accelerated the need for upskilling and reskilling. In many organisations and economies, this crisis has highlighted the discrepancy between the skills people have and those needed for jobs in the digital world. 

4. What was the role of a digital leader when the initial outbreak happened?

The need for digital leadership was brought to the forefront by the pandemic. With the huge transition to work from home (WFH), strong leadership has helped guide and steady employees, and ensure continued productivity. Leaders who understand the application of technologies in the workplace have been able to create new drivers for success, including streamlining operational systems, mindful connection of their employees and improved agility in the workplace. 

5. How has that role evolved and what are the next steps for digital leaders going forward in 2021 and beyond?

Eighty-four percent of employers are set to rapidly digitalise working processes, including a significant expansion of remote work—with the potential to move 44% of their workforce to operate remotely.[2] This is a very significant change towards a digital future. Technology is moving at a rapid pace, and having digital skills is no longer a ‘good to have’, it is critical to business success. Leaders and employees alike must adapt to a cycle of constant learning and upskilling to remain competitive.

6. How do these roles mentioned compare to pre-COVID?

Digital leaders were in demand before the pandemic, but now there is an additional urgency for a pipeline of talent with the skills to implement new technologies in the workplace. In order to create sustainable success, digital technologies must be adopted as a core business strategy – and upskilling is key. In 2020, PwC’s Academy introduced a number of qualifications in the region to support training for the digital economy, including the region’s first qualification for AI, the Certified Artificial Intelligence Practitioner (CAIP). 

7. Whilst the initial strategy for digital leaders was to survive the outbreak, what is the strategy for digital leaders as they look to thrive going forward?

We will see more sophisticated technologies being integrated into the workplace, driven by digital leaders. To support these transformations, we will need to close the existing skills gap, and ensure that younger generations are prepared for the future workplace. 

Young professionals will need huge investment in education and skills development. This requires a collaborative effort from governments, private organisations and education providers. In the Middle East for example, PwC’s Academy is working with the regional governments to upskill the national talent for future leadership roles. We also work with the private and public sector for upskilling solutions in finance, tax, HR, marketing, leadership and management, graduate development, digital transformation to name a few. It is this multi 

faceted approach to upskilling that will help our region to thrive. 

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