UK government boosts Kenyan solar plants by $2.2mn

By Hasit Patel

In a bid to accelerate the development of two solar plants in rural Kenya, the UK government is investing around $2.2mn, according to Business Daily Africa.

Channelling funds through private infrastructure development group firm, InfraCo Africa, with the UK’s Minister for Africa, Harriett Baldwin, has confirmed the funding will be used to develop plants in Samburu and Transmara, with capacities of 10 MW (AC).

“The Samburu and Transmara projects will demonstrate the commercial viability of strategically sited small-scale solar plants (10MWAC and below) and so mobilise greater private sector participation in this market segment,” Baldwin commented.

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With the two power plants expected to add to the increasing electricity projects in the country as Kenya aims to raise the output to 5,000MW and decrease the cost of electricity to consumers by half.

It is expected that the Kenyan government will aim for universal electricity access by 2020, boosted by 70% from 2017.

“To date, private sector investment in Kenyan solar has focused on either large-scale plants or local mini-solar systems,” Baldwin added.

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