May 19, 2020

Three predictions for the future of the Internet

Internet
World Wide Web
Mimecast
Nathaniel Borenstein
Bizclik Editor
3 min
Three predictions for the future of the Internet

By Nathaniel Borenstein, chief scientist at Mimecast

 It has been 25 years since Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web. Over that time, we have experienced tremendous changes in how we share, access and consume information across the world’s most powerful communication vehicle.

 But, as Internet capabilities continue to grow, what do the next 25 years have in store? As it stands today, we are lacking in cooperative international efforts when it comes to Internet governance. 

Such governance will be crucial, as the web continues to evolve, if we want to maximise its benefits and minimise its unwanted side effects, particularly in three key areas that greatly impact society:

 

1 Healthcare - The ever-growing power of our computing devices will have profound implications for healthcare.

For instance, we could see implantable networked devices become commonplace. These devices will offer great benefits, such as detecting and preventing diseases by alerting individuals and their medical professionals of vitamin deficiencies, irregular cell counts, degrading organ functions, or even early-stage cancer.

These same devices, however, could do more harm than good,from revealing personal medical information to triggering a heart attack,  if they fall under the control of malicious actors.

2Crime Prevention - Surveillance technology and its regulation are already a hot topic today. But we will have much more to contend with in another quarter century, as Internet capabilities continue to advance. 

Continuing miniaturisation will probably mean that we’ll have effectively invisible cameras nearly everywhere – even embedded in our clothing. 

 On the one hand, recording the daily actions of citizens worldwide may bring a major decrease in crime, as visible crime becomes less likely to succeed. 

But on the other hand, uncontrolled surveillance may bring forth a rise in intrusive snooping from government agencies, corporations, and other entities.

 As such, we’ll need to continually and carefully consider how such surveillance technologies should be used, and to consider measures such as mandated transparency to allow us to “watch the watchers.”

3 Technology’s Impact on Manufacturing - Technological advances over the next 25 years are likely to result in widespread adoption of 3D printing, allowing people to print things at home that would otherwise require whole industries.

 This could result in a boom for home invention, with things like new design innovations coming more quickly to light. It’s possible that the Internet will once again rewrite supply chains, likely to the detriment of traditional manufacturing. We could experience a further shift to an economy based not on the supply of physical objects, but digital ones.

 

The Internet and the World Wide Web have already transformed the world in many ways. Few would have predicted, 25 years ago, the progress we’ve already made. 

We can predict much of the likely technological innovation in the next 25 years, but how these powerful technologies are used will depend critically on the decisions society makes – or chooses not to make. 

While the possibilities seem endless, it is up to human beings to decide which changes are desirable, and which should be resisted.

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Jun 14, 2021

5 minutes with... Janthana Kaenprakhamroy, CEO, Tapoly

Tapoly
Insurance
Leadership
Digital
Kate Birch
3 min
Heading up Europe’s first on-demand insurance platform for the gig economy, Janthana Kaenprakhamroy is winning awards and leading with diversity

Founder and CEO of award-winning insurtech firm Tapoly, Janthana Kaenprakhamroy heads up Europe’s first on-demand insurance platform for the gig economy, winning industry awards, innovating in the digital insurance space, and leading with inclusivity.

Here, Business Chief talks to Janthana about her leadership style and skills. 

What do you do, in a nutshell?

I’m founder and CEO of Tapoly, a digital MGA providing a full stack of commercial lines insurance specifically for SMEs and freelancers, as well as a SaaS solution to connect insurers with their distribution partners. We build bespoke, end-to-end platforms encompassing the whole customer journey, but can also integrate our APIs within existing systems. We were proud to win Insurance Provider of the Year at the British Small Business Awards 2018 and receive silver in the Insurtech category at the Efma & Accenture Innovation in Insurance Awards 2019.

How would you describe your leadership style?

I try to be as inclusive a leader as possible. I’m committed to creating space for everyone to shine. Many of the roles at Tapoly are performed by women and I speak at industry events to encourage more people to get involved in insurance/insurtech. Similarly, I always try to maintain a growth mindset. I think it’s important to retain values to support learning and development, like reliability, working hard and punctuality.

What’s the best leadership advice you’ve received?

Build your network and seek advice. As a leader, you need smart people around you to help you grow your business. It’s not about personally being the best, but being able to find resources and get help where needed.

How do you see leadership changing in a COVID world?

I think the pandemic has proven the importance of inclusive leadership so that everyone feels supported and valued. It’s also shown the importance of being flexible as a leader. We’ve had to remain adaptable to continue delivering high levels of customer service. This flexibility has also been important when supporting employees as everyone has had individual pressures to deal with during this time. Leaders should continue to embed this flexibility within their organisations moving forward.

They say ‘from every crisis comes opportunity’, what opportunities do you see?

The past year has been challenging, but it has also proven the importance of digital transformation in insurance. When working from home was required, it was much harder for insurers to adjust who had not embedded technology within their operating processes because they did not have data stored in the cloud and it caused communication delays with concerned customers at a time when this communication should have been a priority, which ultimately impacts the level of customer satisfaction. This demonstrates the importance of what we are trying to achieve at Tapoly in driving digitalisation in insurance and making communication between insurers and distribution partners seamless. 

What advice would you give to your younger self just starting out in the industry?

Start sooner, don’t be afraid to take (calculated) risks and make sure you raise enough money to get you through the initial seed stage.

 

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