Apr 14, 2021

Socially Responsible Data Centres

Ark Data Centres
Bladeroom
Bizclik Editor
3 min
Socially Responsible Data Centres
For many businesses, improving sustainability now sits squarely at the top of the agenda and it’s a principle we share with the customers we serve...

BladeRoom are global leaders in the provision of highly energy–efficient data centres, manufacturing a sustainable and scalable solution capable of being deployed anywhere in the world 

For many businesses, improving sustainability now sits squarely at the top of the agenda and it’s a principle we share with the customers we serve.  

That’s why our data centres are designed around innovative technology that is proven to dramatically reduce energy consumption and carbon emissions.

A BladeRoom data centre, with its latest technological advances, uses zero mechanical cooling or refrigerants, and can operate at an annualised PUE of 1.04. This represents less than 4% of the total energy required to power the entire data centre and compared to the industry average, it is over 10 times more efficient. At the scale of a 100MW BladeRoom campus, situated in the UK, this results in annual carbon emission savings of up to 110,000 tonnes. 

At the scale of a 100MW BladeRoom campus, situated in the UK, this results in carbon emission savings over the next 20 years of up to 2.2 million tonnes.

The real and significant reductions in carbon footprint that we are helping our clients to deliver today are the result of our 10-year commitment to innovation and continuous improvement and it is our mission to continue this journey towards a better and more responsible digital future

Data centres don’t get any cooler than this

BladeRoom facilities use an advanced cooling system, maximising free, filtered, ambient air with evaporative cooling. Free cooling is available for up to 100% of the time depending on the climate and supply air setpoints - saving significant cost and carbon emissions.

The design of the BladeRoom system is based around some simple guiding principles:

1. to extract maximum heat from IT

2. to deploy mechanical cooling rarely, and

3. to use filtered ambient air and evaporative cooling to achieve 99+% free air cooling.

Rather than re-circulating and cooling the hot air from the IT as with traditional data centre cooling, a BladeRoom data centre operates like a server by drawing in highly filtered fresh air, intelligently matching air supply to IT demand and exhausting or partially recirculating warm air from the data centre as required.

Evaporative and free cooling enables the IT equipment to be cooled with supply air temperatures of between 18°C and 30°C for more than 99% of the year in the UK without the need for mechanical cooling across a range of IT loads, still performing efficiently at 15% utilisation of racks.

Why ‘Factory-First’ Matters

By manufacturing our data centres in our 110,000ft2 factory, we offer a sustainable alternative to site-based construction which in turn, provides a more resource-efficient way to create socially responsible facilities.

In our factory materials are tightly controlled which dramatically reduces waste, with noise and pollution levels minimised, and site-based operational risks transferred to a more secure environment.

Our ‘Factory-first’ production approach allows deliveries to be made to the factory in bulk from local suppliers, minimising transport and heavy goods emissions. Materials are tightly controlled which dramatically reduces waste, with noise and pollution levels minimised, and site-based operational risks are transferred to a more secure environment.

With only a fraction of the programme taking place on the client's site, our ‘Factory-first’ approach reduces the typical emissions produced by on-site construction and in turn, contributes significantly towards the combined sustainability objectives that we share with our customers.

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May 15, 2021

Orange leads solar panel deployment in Middle East, Africa

Orange
Renewables
Sustainability
Telecommunications
Kate Birch
3 min
To further reduce its global environmental footprint, Orange is accelerating its solar projects, from panels to farms, across Africa and the Middle East

Orange has become the first company by number of solar panels in five countries across the Middle East and Africa, following the telco’s recent acceleration of its solar projects.

Such acceleration comes in light of Orange Group's worldwide commitment to reducing its carbon footprint to zero by 2040 along with its commitment to the Middle East and Africa (MEA), the Group’s main growth region with Orange MEA currently present in 18 countries and having achieved €5.8 billion in turnover in 2020.

Upping renewable energy usage in MEA

Across the region, many Orange sites are not connected to the electricity grid and even when they are, the quality often requires alternative backup solutions. To avoid using generators that run on fuel, emitting CO2 as a consequence, Orange has put in place, and continues to put in place, a variety of initiatives such as solar panels.

In fact, the telco has now installed solar panels at 5,400 of its telecom sites, saving 55m litres of fuel each year, and can now claim a renewable energy use rate at over 50% for Orange Guinea, 41% for Orange Madagascar and 40% for Orange Sierra Leone, with solar panel solutions currently being deployed in Liberia, where 75% of Orange’s telecom sites are equipped with solar panels.

So far, so Orange. But that’s not all. In Jordan, Orange has unveiled three solar farms to switch to clean and renewable energy helping to reduce its carbon footprint. In 2020, these solar farm projects covered more than 65% of Orange Jordan’s energy needs. Since 2018, the company has successfully reduced its CO2 emissions by 45 kilotons thanks to this solar infrastructure.

“We are proud to be the first company by number of solar panels in 5 countries in Africa and the Middle East,” says Alioune Ndiaye, CEO of Orange Middle East and Africa.  

Orange’s global green plans

As a stakeholder in the energy transition, Orange Group has included in its Engage 2025 strategic plan (unveiled in 2019 and guided by social and environment accountability) the objective of meeting 50% of the Group’s electricity needs from renewable sources by 2025 with the aim of achieving net zero carbon by 2040.

Earlier this year in February, Orange Group teamed up with ENGIE, the leading developer of solar and wind power in France, to deliver a global renewable energy supply solution in the country, including the development of two new solar farms in the Hautes Alpes region set to be operational by January 1, 2023.

According to Fabienne DulacOrange’s EVP and CEO of Orange France, “reducing our environmental footprint is major part of Orange’s strategy” and by 2025, the Group “plans to reduce 30% of its direct CO2 emissions compared to 2015 and reach an electricity mix made up of 50% renewable energy”.

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